Posts Tagged ‘Tom Sutdliffe’

Talent

November 12, 2014

TalentHead

An old family story has my mother chastising my (at the time little) sister, over her apparent disparaging commentary in respect of a small boy who shared her class at primary school. According to my sister, this boy apparently lacked any skill with regards mathematics or some such academic subject. “Darling, you must understand that everyone is good at something” say’s mother, to which my sister apparently replied “Well I should think that he is good at digging holes, because his granny is always taking him to the beach”..

Now I have always tried to hang on to my mother’s message, there is talent all around us and we don’t necessarily get to choose at what we are talented, there is to my mind a high likelihood that at least part of it is genetic. Actually the very reason that this blog is called “The Fishing Gene”, because I have always loved to fish, no matter that I cannot see any direct relationship with a recent ancestry which appears almost entirely devoid of piscatorial interest. But the point is that there is talent surrounding us and within all of us, frequently we don’t see it, not in others and as importantly not in ourselves.

In Malcolm Gladwell’s book: Outliers, one of the themes is that to be exceptional at something one needs to spend 10,000 hours at it, all well and good but it doesn’t escape me that you are highly unlikely to put in that amount of time without passion.

Certainly those , to my mind, tedious “Britain’s Got Talent”, “America’s Got Talent”, “X-factor” and similar shows have a place, and they do afford gifted people to show off their skills, but they focus entirely on the show business, music industry sorts of things, as though that was all there was as a measure for excellence. In the end I can’t get past the idea that it is more about whether Simon Cowell and his ilk can make some money out of your skills than whether the world might appreciate those talents.

Here in South Africa we seem to have developed a near paranoia about our own value, the stigma of the Apartheid years, the vilification from the world at large, the economic downturns and more have left many with the feeling that “imports are better”, that “other people and other nations” have skills and that we should sit back as the whipping boys of the global stage.

So it was more than a little refreshing this past weekend to be amongst a number of truly talented people, certainly only a microcosm of what talent lies about us but at least a sample. A sample of excellence that is world class, people who need not bow their heads in front of any international audience and who, to be quite frank the rest of the world needs to know a bit more about. Not because there are no other talented people , they are I suspect on every street corner but because the media control who you hear about and who not. Because those TV shows only give a glimpse of the tip of the iceberg in terms of skills that abound.

OpenGardenGarden Open Day in aid of Red Cross Children’s Hospital Trust

The event was an open garden day in the upmarket suburb of Bishop’s Court in Cape Town, the garden an absolute picture, good enough to be appreciated by even as accomplished a plant killer as myself. I may well have talents, but green fingers don’t feature amongst them, as generations of desiccated, abused and yellowed vegetation in my garden can attest.

The garden in question is the proud creation of Sharland Urquhart, and it was opened up for the day to raise funds for the Red Cross Children’s Hospital Trust. An organization providing assistance to South Africa’s and quite possibly Africa’s best centre of paediatric care.

RedCross

But Sharland’s talents aren’t limited to gardening and landscaping, she has the ability to collect around her some of the most talented and interesting people you may care to meet.

So from that day here is my own “South Africa’s got talent” offering:  all these people who participated in the day and gave of their time and profits to the cause of the Hospital Trust.

 

 Tom Sutcliffe: Actually it is Dr Tom Sutcliffe but he wouldn’t tell you that unless you knew. Tom is in terms of South African fly fishing “the John Gierach of the South”.

TomBooks Books by Tom Sutcliffe

He virtually single-handedly put South African Fly fishing and South African Fly fishing writing on the map. He was party to the country’s very first dedicated fly fishing retail outlet “The Fly Fisherman” in Pietermartizberg and now has a library shelf of very readable and informative titles to his name. Including “My Way with a Trout”, “Shadows on a Stream Bed” , “Hunting Trout”. Sadly some of his books are out of print, but you may still be able to rustle up a copy on line if you are prepared to pay for them. But on top of being an exceptional author and medical doctor Tom is also an accomplished artist, capturing the very essence of trout and rivers in lovingly fashioned water colours and he still finds the time to manage a blog/newsletter on line on a weekly basis. You can link up with Tom via his newsletter/website at http://www.tomsutcliffe.co.za/

Tom Watercolour

Tom Sutcliffe Watercolour

 TomRhodes

Tom Sutcliffe drawing of Rhodes

 

Gordon van der Spuy: Actor, fly fisher and fly tyer, Gordon is one of the few who have the patience to spend hours creating the perfectly balanced salmon fly. Actually if you met him you wouldn’t believe that he could sit still that long. His talent and passion is only ouweighed by his absolute enthusiasm for all the things that he does. Gordon, along with Ed Herbst was giving fly tying demonstrations during the course of the day.

GordonSalmonFly

Sandy Griffiths: I hadn’t come across Sandy’s work previously but it really is quite exceptional, Sandy doesn’t only make pewter objects but equally is again a writer with several books about pewter work to her name.

SandySandalsSandyNotebookSandyCandleThe sheer variety of Sandy’s work is remarkable.

 

As said, I don’t know a lot about Sandy’s work other than this one day, but that was enough for me to need to own a piece of it, I figure that is recommendation enough. Book titles include: “Easy Pewter Projects”, “Pewter It” and “Pewter Impressions”.

SandyBooks
You can find out more about Sandy’s work and books on her website at http://sandygriffithspewter.com/ and you can obtain her books from Kalahri

Stephen Boshoff: Stephen is a town planner or something of that ilk in his “real life” but actually that is simply a front for a man who is far more at home being anally retentive about wood.

BoshoffSignageEven the signage says something about Stephen’s Talents

You won’t believe that Steve can do with wood and thankfully he ploughs much of that talent into wood that has a fly fishing theme. Cane Rods and wooden nets, fly boxes and even chest packs, his attention to detail is frightening to us mere mortals.

BoshoffDisa

Cane Rod with Cape Disa engraved butt plate

Crystal clear wraps on the rods and even a model that incorporates the reel in the design for better balance. You can purchase a custom built cane rod from Stephen for a fraction of what you might pay to better known makers but chances are you are likely to “get in on the ground floor” of an investment because I am quite sure that his work is going to become internationally recognized and cherished in time.

SteveCenterAxis

Steve’s remarkably innovative “Centre Axis” Rod design

 

Chris Bladen: Dental technician turned Sculptor. I can still remember the days when Chris was making jewelry in the centrifugal devices used for casting dental implants and false teeth. I am not sure if he was supposed to be doing that, there may well be a little old lady out there somewhere with a trout secretly embedded in the back of her dentures.

ChrisDoradoBronze Dorado and Flying Fish

Another of those people for whom attention to detail isn’t just a fleeting thought but a way of life. Now Chris is internationally acclaimed for his work in bronze, with a particular emphasis on fish. When it comes to fish sculpture I doubt that Chris has a peer, from schools of flying fish to life sized leaping sailfish his work is simply beyond compare.

ChrisGT

Giant Trevally

That Chris studies fish, catches fish (on fly of course), and watches fish is immediately apparent in the form of his works. These art pieces capture the very spirit of the wild, every sinew straining, every muscle taught, movement in a static object, simply wonderful. Chris has pioneered a lot of patina techniques which give his creations life-like colour and already he creates the trophies for the Del Brown Invitational Tournament in the Florida Keys. You can find out more about Chris’s work on his website at http://www.chrisbladen.com/

ChrisTarponLeaping Tarpon

Red Cross Children’s Hospital: Finally the Doctors and Nurses of the Red Cross Children’s Hospital, they are equally talented, world class to be frank and desperately underfunded, which I figure was the point of the open garden day in the first place. Talent isn’t talent unless it is shared, who can question if the beauty of Sharland Urquhart’s immaculate garden, Stephen Boshoff’s hand crafted rods, Chris Bladen’s Sculpture’s, Sandy Griffiths’ pewter feathers or a Tom Sutcliffe’s water colours will ever outweigh that of the face of a smiling child who was sick and is now well?

 

RedCrossFace

Talented people, helping talented doctors put smiles back on children’s faces.

I doubt that this is much of a list of South African Talent, but if this amount of skill, dedication and passion can be found in one exquisite garden on a Saturday afternoon, who knows what lies out there?

I know that there are still lots of other people like Mario Geldenhuys (rods and nets), Steven Dugmore (Cane rods), Deon Stamner (Wooden nets), Peter Brigg (Author) and many more who have passion and talent in abundence.

At least it’s a start, a start in recognizing that talent is everywhere, not just amongst others but amongst your countrymen and women, amongst your friends and if you look closely I strongly suspect you may well find some within yourself.

I doubt that there is any higher calling than doing what you do well, whether you are simply an exceptional father, mother, partner, fireman, metal worker or doctor, talent is within us all, and talent, to be of value should be shared.

So here’s to talent, to the skill and passion that enriches our lives and the lives of those around us.

Fish Food Flies

May 9, 2014

FishFoodFliesHead

Fish food flies

I recently ran an intensive weekend course for a group of lovely ladies who were relatively new to fly fishing or indeed complete novices. It was billed as a “Ladies Fly Fishing Boot Camp” and in a couple of short days we covered all the essential elements of fly fishing from the history of the sport dating back to the Romans to modern tackle, knots and casting. Plus a day’s fishing as well, yes more than a few of the ladies had virtually never so much as touched a fly rod, so it was a tall order to try to get them to the point of catching fish in such a short period of time. That most of them did actually catch fish and a couple their FIRST EVER fish on fly gear I think would register the program as a success.FishFoodBootCampLogoThe lesson for me though was that actually fly fishing is pretty simple most of the time, and perhaps we put off as many potential advocates as we attract by overcomplicating things. Sure we all love to delve into fish psychology, entomology, some (I tend to think overly sociopathic types) even resort to Latin names and discuss Mayfly wing venation for hours, but in reality for the most part fly fishing doesn’t need to be complex.

When one is constructing an intensive program like this one however one is faced with the dilemma of how to distil 43 years of fly fishing experience into a day’s worth of lectures and casting practise? Eventually you get to the point that you remove all of the “fluff”. Fly fishing in essence, as I told the girls, is simply a case of putting a fly that looks like food, in front of a fish such that it behaves like food and the fish eat it. Now we all know that it can be more complicated than that but how much of the time? How many of us don’t rely more on a handful of favourite fly patterns, hopefully adequate casting and a dash of on the water savvy to achieve success during most forays to the water?

So it was that after a day’s intensive training we headed out to the lake to see if we couldn’t get the girls in touch with their first trout. Bobbing about in the boat with Rena as my first pupil we rigged up tackle as we had practised. The girls only used a single fly because of course their neophyte casting status pre-empted more complicated and tangle prone rigging and I selected a pattern from my fly box, clinching it to the end of the tippet. Then the inevitable question: “what fly is that”, (the girls had been introduced to mayflies, midges, terrestrials and even metamorphosis and were sharp enough to recognise the apparent difficulty in selecting the right pattern). So I told Rena “It’s a fish food fly”. 🙂

BootCamp4FBRena with her “first ever trout” on fly tackle, courtesy of the “Fish Food Fly”

When you get right down to it most of the time that’s what we all fish, “fish food flies”. This particular pattern a long shanked construction manufactured of rabbit fur is a favourite of mine for stillwater fishing, in fact rarely off the leader although unlike the girls I do manage to have three patterns on there at once.

FishFoodFly

It has gone through a lot of modifications over the years, initially a classical style “Hare’s Ear Nymph”, then a “Monty Nymph”, which was exactly the same construction but fashioned from the hair of my long since departed cat Monty. The fly has variously sported hackle legs, wingcases and flashbacks at different times, mostly to suit the mood of the angler more than the fish. Now I tie them up in various colour combinations from bright red to the normal dull underfur tones of the original but they all work. Some have beads just to aid in the turnover of the level leader when there is no breeze and most have a degree of toning built in, generally with darker dubbing near the eye but again I suspect that is more to do with the angler than the views of the trout.

I have inordinate faith in this style of fly, it is quick to manufacture, easily adapted to varied colour combinations and sports all the attributes of, what I at least imagine, spell out the words “DINNER TIME” to a marauding trout. Subtle colouration, a generically nymph type shape and lots of movement courtesy of a healthy scrubbing with the Velcro strip that is always in my fly tying kit.

FishFoodCasual DressPolly Rosborough was famous for his “Fuzzy Nymphs”

I figure that most living things that trout eat turn out to be perfectly palatable to them and that possibly the most obvious distinction between things living and inanimate is simply that subtle movement. Real food wriggles, gills flare, legs kick whatever, movement indicates life and if you are a trout, life tends to indicate in turn the arrival of your lunch.

Most fly anglers have come to similar conclusions:

Polly Rosborough of “Fuzzy Flies” fame. (Author of “Tying and fishing Fuzzy Nymphs”) pretty much bet the farm on subtle movement in his patterns.
Sylvester Nemes (The Softhackled Fly Addict) took much the same view, although perhaps on a more microscopic level.
South Africa’s Tom Sutcliffe,(Author or “My Way with a Trout”, “Shadows on a Stream Bed” and “Elements of Fly Tying”) has inordinate faith in his “Zak Nymph”, with its buggy profile and wiggling and sparse palmered hackle.

FishFoodSoftHackleSubtle movement, even in tiny flies is often the key to success.

If all else fails the idea of incorporating subtle movement into your subsurface patterns has to be a winner. Without getting too detailed or overly complicated the simple illusion of life will pay dividends more often than not.

So sure we can complicate things, even successfully at times but when the chips are down, when you are searching out fish without a clue as to what is going on under the water, well then I am reaching for my “fish food flies”, they work for me, they worked for the ladies on the weekend and no doubt they will work for you too.

SignatureCompendium3

Now also available from www.inkwaziflyfishing.co.za “Guide Flies” the latest book from the author of this blog, in either eBook or printed softcover formats..

Guide Flies Front Cover