Posts Tagged ‘Marabou Muddler Minnow’

Lockdown Day 14

April 9, 2020

Corona lock down Day 14

Two weeks, two whole weeks of being at home, hard on all of us, although it does strike me that it is odd that I could rarely “find a day” to go fishing when I was allowed to, I think that might change in the future for many of us.

The way things are going it is entirely possible that the streams will be closed before we are able to access them, so today a focus on a little used stillwater pattern but a great one to tie.

The Marabou Muddler minnow

There have been so many variations of the Muddler minnow, as with so many classic flies, that it is hard to know what they are supposed to imitate: minnows (as the name would suggest), dragonfly nymphs, cicadas, hoppers, crickets. The Muddler in various guises probably does a pretty good job of all of those which is no doubt part of the reason for its popularity. The Muddler also has the versatility to be fished as a dry or a wet fly, a popper or a streamer, which probably makes it close to unique in the world of trout flies.  The marabou muddler is probably an out and out lure, at least when tied in bright colours, one could imagine perhaps that the white version would make a fair baitfish pattern. But if we don’t restrict ourselves to trout, the same fly makes a great bass fly pattern to.

What perhaps makes it less popular is that it is relatively time consuming to construct and not necessarily that easy either. The key element is of course manipulating and cutting the deer hair head to the right size and shape, and even then “Right size and shape” means different things to different people.

A white Marabou Muddler would make a pretty good baitfish imitation.

I don’t fish this fly often but I do use it as an alternative to a “Booby” style lure, it has a bit more appeal to me compared to the foam eyed lure and no doubt performs in much the same way in the water. The only issue is that I can tie up half a dozen boobies in the time it takes me to tie two decent Muddlers. So for the most part I tend towards the path of least resistance, but with so much time on our hands why not try tying up a few Muddlers instead?

The “Texas Rose Muddler” was a very popular stillwater lure in the UK during the 70’s

An orange Marabou Muddler fits pretty much the same bill as an orange booby which I use both as a simple attractor pattern on the top dropper of a team, and as a great pattern when the fish are feeding on Daphnia where orange flies have proven to be particularly successful.  Plus I kind of like the more “old school” approach versus the modern foam eyed constructions, not that I will shy away from those if the need arises..  For now, with time on one’s hands, a great opportunity to tie up some more complicated and satisfying patterns perhaps.

Black Marabou Muddler,with so many colours of marabou available you have near endless choice as to what colour scheme your Muddler might have.

As with yesterday’s post I am going to include the instructions along with the graphics and video.

• Place a strong nymph hook in the vice and run touching turns of thread from ⅓ back the shank to the bend, you leave the front portion free of thread to aid spinning the hair later.

• Tie in a small bunch of turkey marabou, leaving enough of the butts overhanging the hook to form an abdomen later.

• Wind the thread through the butts of the bunched marabou in open turns to form a simple body, stopping the thread approximately a third of the way back from the eye. Trim off any excess marabou.

• Tie in with a pinch and loop another bunch of marabou to form the wing, it should reach just a little past the bend of the hook. Tied in longer it will tend to wrap around the hook during fishing.

• Trim off the butts of the wing and prepare to start adding the deer hair collar and head.

• Stack a bunch of deer hair in a hair stacker to even up the tips.

• Remove the hair from the stacker with the points facing towards the back of the hook.

• Measure up so as to create a neat collar that will reach approximately half way back the wing.

• Using the method for spinning deer hair on a dressed body, “spin” or “distribute” the hair of the collar evenly around the hook, fold the butts of the hair back towards the bend of the hook and take the thread forwards in front of the bunch of hair.

• Add an additional bunch of hair, this time there is no need to stack it. It helps to tie in the hair in reverse with the points left long as then it will be easier later to fold the hair back and made a neat whip finish.

• Spin the second bunch of hair on the bare hook shank, pulling tighter with each turn of thread until the bunch is firmly attached and spun neatly around the hook.

• Pull back the hair towards the bend of the hook, take the thread to the front and form a neat whip finish.

• Trim the hair in stages, first getting the correct shape before cutting down to the correct size.

• Take care not to cut off the points which form the collar.

• Add a drop of head cement to the whip finish and you are done.

This post and the fly described comes from my book “Essential Fly Tying Techniques” if you would like to purchase a downloadable copy of it or my other book “Guide Flies” you will find both links and discount codes below. The discount code will let you purchase the book at a 50% discount during lock down.

Discount code Essential Fly Tying Techniques: DR62J Code will expire 17 April 2020

Discount code Guide Flies : SB94S Code will expire 17 April 2020

Thanks for reading, stay safe out there.