Posts Tagged ‘Indicator Dry Flies’

Lockdown Day 15

April 10, 2020

Probably all of us at some time battle to see a fly, either because it is small or perhaps dark or even submerged and the use of some sort of indicator can be helpful in either monitoring takes or in “finding” the fly. It is remarkable how often if one has some sort of sighter one can see even tiny flies once you know where to look. So today an alternative that you may like to experiment with , dry flies tied specifically to be used as indicators or sighters.

There are any number or ways of adding and indicator or fishing two flies at once, either with a dropper, tied eye to eye, New Zealand Rig (Which I am not fond of) and I am sure more.

Here are a few options from my book “100 Fly Fishing Tips, Tricks and Techniques” :

One can leave a longer tag on the final tippet knot (Grinner, Surgeons etc) and attach a dry fly to that, and adding a nymph or second dry fly to the tippet. It has the disadvantage of tangling more easily, but offers better contact with a nymph set up.

 

My preferred method on streams with either two dries or a dry and nymph set up, easy to change, less tangles and little interference when striking takes on the top fly.

 

This method provides similar results to the eye to eye method but where you find it difficult to fit two tippets through the eye of a hook this can offer an alternative. Just tie a Grinner knot link above the dry fly and slide it down onto the dry fly eye.

 

This is a very commonly used system but I believe it has a serious disadvantage in terms of impeding hook sets on takes to the upper fly. So I personally don’t use this one.

 

Another alternative, by carrying a fly already linked to a short and looped section of tippet you can easily change the indicator fly without major re-rigging.

 

With a little forward planning at the tying bench you can manufacture flies specifically designed to easily use as indicators when required.

Indicator Dry Flies:
I have a strong dislike for indicators, they are effective to be sure and I will use them, but years in international competition where they are not allowed has led to some experimentation which has proved tremendously useful.

Using dry flies as indicators isn’t new and of course apart from the advantage of revealing a subtle take to a subsurface fly they can equally be tremendously effective when fishing two dry flies together. This is something that I have found of use more and more frequently, either due to failing eyesight or the simple fact that some insects are too small and too dull to imitate properly and still be seen on the water. Even parachute posts don’t offer all the answers and some wary fish will undoubtedly avoid white or bright posted flies.

Some years back I was fishing with my good friend Mike Spinola on a section of a local stream known for lower fish counts and consequently bigger fish. Arriving at a particular run there were a few good sized rainbow trout, up to about 18” in length feeding steadily at the head where the current concentrated the food into a narrow band along a distinct bubble line.
We had already experienced some success but the fish eschewed our offerings; despite the fact that they had worked earlier in the day. We could see some dark Choraterpes mayflies coming off but suitable imitations were extremely tricky to see in the broken water and low light.
Tying on a small CDC spun dun with a pale wing I then added a few feet of 7x tippet, running from the eye of the CDC pattern and added the Choraterpes imitation to the end of that.

Dry and dropper rigs offer the angler greater versatility when on the water.

Although I had been unable to see the dark mayfly on its own, now, knowing where it was by virtue of the brighter CDC pattern it was much easier to follow in the current, and I had the added advantage that should I miss the actual take the indicator fly would hopefully twitch and offer a clue.
The set up worked tremendously well and we extracted several hard fighting rainbows from that run before we put the fish down.

On one notable occasion the flies drifted so closely together on the converging currents that a trout actually pushed the CDC pattern out of the way with its nose as it ate the darker pattern. Proof that on occasion the fish would focus entirely on flies which we found difficult to see.
Since then I have experimented a lot with indicator fly rigs and one of the advances has been to tie a number of my more visible dry flies with nylon loops incorporated into the dressing. That leaves me the option of adding a
nymph or second dry on a short length of tippet at any point that I wish with minimal disruption. It is easily removed again or changed without upsetting the leader and I can quickly switch from single dry to two dries or an upstream nymph rig at will.

As conditions change being able to adjust one’s terminal set up easily offers advantages to the angler

The set up isn’t competition legal, but for everyone else it represents a style of tying some of your dry flies which provides considerable flexibility and versatility when on the water and of course doesn’t prevent one from using the pattern as a single fly should you wish. Versatility is a key component of “Guide Flies” as far as I am concerned and manufacturing some of your dries in this way will I am no doubt add to your effectiveness on the stream.

Making up “Indicator Dry Flies”

Refer to (FIG#38)
The process is remarkably simple and it is easily incorporated into your normal fly tying.

Before you tie any suitable dry fly simply run the thread down the hook, use the finest thread you can to reduce bulk, even if you change over for the actual pattern.

#1: Run touching turns of thread down the shank of the hook to the bend.

#2: Take a short length of tippet material and “nibble” the ends gently with either your teeth or a pair of pliers. This is to provide additional purchase for the thread when tying in. The nylon should be a little stronger than your normal tippet strength, I normally use 5X as I fish 6X and 7X as terminal tackle most of the time.

#3: Tie in one end to the hook shank with two turns of thread.

#4: Catch in the other end of the nylon with the next two turns of thread as you work in touching turns back to the eye of the hook. You can pull the nylon at this point to provide the loop size that you require, it only needs to be very small. (Think of the size of the hook eye, twice that size is more than enough).

#5: Wrap touching turns of thread all along the shank of the hook catching in the nylon as you go.

#6: Just short of the eye, trim the butts of the nylon, cover with thread and whip finish. It isn’t strictly necessary but you can add a drop of head cement to the wraps if you wish.

#7: Use the hook with the loop added to tie your favoured indicator dry fly. Parachutes, Elk Hair Caddis patterns and even hopper patterns make good indicators. If you really want to be clever you can pre-treat the flies with hydro-stop waterproofing as well.

The rigging diagrams in this post come from my eBook “100 Fly Fishing Tips, Tricks and Techniques” the book is available on line in a variety of different formats, pdf, mobi (kindle) and others on the link “100 Fly Fishing Tips, Tricks and Techniques”

Thanks for reading and stay safe.