Posts Tagged ‘Dragon Fly Nymph’

Lockdown Flytying Day 20

April 15, 2020

Day 20 of our now extended lock down here in South Africa, one more day to keep to my original commitment. For now a larger and perhaps slightly more troublesome pattern although more fiddly than difficult.

The Mobile Marabou Dragon.
Although dragonfly nymphs don’t feature heavily in the fly boxes of some anglers in a wide number of the places we fish, in South Africa, New Zealand and a few others the value of a dragonfly nymph imitation can’t be understated.

Dragons not only inhabit the waters throughout the year because they take such a long time to reach adulthood, and you therefore know they are there (as indeed do the fish), but they equally represent a substantial mouthful to a hungry and predatory trout. It would probably be fair to say that few if any trout waters contain no dragonfly nymphs and if you are in doubt of where to start a dragonfly (or indeed a corixa pattern) are pretty fair bets. The fish may not be feeding on them but they more than likely will if presented with a decent representation.

Dragonfly nymphs range in colour from near black to dark brown but variations of olive are probably the most common.

The only trouble has been that despite many attempts and the use of lots of other patterns I never really had a dragon fly nymph pattern that I liked. They were either too “stiff” or overly complicated or in many instances too simple. Friends used to fish a dragonfly nymph imitation that was little more than huge lump of wool on a long shanked hook with the addition of eyes to make it at least appear like something to the human eye. It was effective but to my mind a dreadfully ugly concoction. The only really interesting thing about some of these patterns was the eye.

At one time many of my fishing associates used simple dragon fly nymph patterns similar to that above. They work, they emphasize the shape and head/eye prominence of the real bug quite well. To me they are however a tad ineligant and lack movement by comparison to the maribou dragon.

Guy Kedian years ago put me onto the idea of using the material from black plastic worms used by bass anglers as a material for eyes. It is a little tricky to work with but can be formed into superbly life like eyes with the application of the heat of a cigarette lighter.

Dragonfly nymphs come in two basic shapes, cigar shaped ones and more stubby short and oval ones, you can adapt the pattern to suite by simply changing the hook used in the manufacture.

The dragonfly that I now use, and actually the only one I use is manufactured out of tufts of marabou, providing maximum life like movement. Real dragonfly nymphs propel themselves, or at least can propel themselves, by sucking in and expelling water from their anuses. They therefore appear to “breath in and out” when jetting along,Something that can clearly be seen if you watch a specimen in an aquarium tank. The marabou isn’t so much to imitate abdominal gills as with perhaps baetis mayflies, the dragonfly nymph appears fairly smooth, but it does “inhale and exhale” as it moves and the idea is to include some significant movement to the pattern without having to fish it fast.

I am very much of the opinion that when manufacturing a fly that is this big it needs to be pretty realistic, one assumes that trout find it easier to spot a fake in a larger fly than a small one, much as you may notice a dent in your car but not perhaps a scratch. It is for this reason that the Mobile Marabou Dragon was born, to offer a very realistic and highly mobile pattern. It is fiddly to tie perhaps but not actually complex and it has slaughtered trout in numerous stillwaters fished from both bank and boat.

The Mobile Marabou Dragon is designed to provide exaggeration of key features such as the eye/head shape as well as mobility even when fished slowly.

I far prefer to fish most flies slowly and thus a pattern which is mobile and imitative whilst requiring little movement from the angler is the sort of thing which appeals to me. Bear in mind though that fishing flies slowly, and that goes for many if not all of the patterns in this book designed for stillwater fishing, means that you need to concentrate and look for hints of a take.

Waiting for the line to pull tight is the worst possible means of fishing flies like this, any hint of an interception, a stab down of the leader or line or the slight tightening of waves in the line on the water might be the only indication that a fish has taken the fly. Don’t imagine that because it is a large pattern it will necessarily be taken violently. Although dragon fly nymphs can move quite fast they don’t do that much of the time and it doesn’t take a great deal of effort on the part of the trout to overhaul the nymph and eat it. This pattern, although effective in a number of scenarios is probably at its best fished slowly on a floating line over weedbeds where the dragonfly nymphs hunt their prey.

Some great footage of both shapes of dragonfly nymph swimming underwater. Courtesy of TroutFodder channel on YouTube.

 

Dragonfly nymphs, like damsels, don’t hatch at the surface as do mayflies and caddis flies, it takes them too long to emerge from the nymphal shuck, so you are not trying to imitate hatching insects but rather those living in the water and hunting. As such they probably represent a fairly opportunistic meal for a trout, but that is no bad thing, it is likely that many fish not necessarily focused on dragonfly nymphs will still take one if the opportunity presents itself.

Tying the Mobile Marabou Dragon

 

 

This post and the fly described comes from my book “Guide Flies” if you would like to purchase a downloadable copy of it or my other book “Essential Fly Tying Techniques” you will find both links and discount codes below. The discount code will let you purchase the book at a 50% discount during lock down.

Discount code Essential Fly Tying Techniques: DR62J Code will expire 17 April 2020

Discount code Guide Flies : SB94S Code will expire 17 April 2020

Thanks for reading, stay safe out there.