Archive for April 11th, 2020

Lockdown Day 16

April 11, 2020

Getting good and getting quick

With all of us shut in and boredom taking hold I run the risk of making you all even more bored, sorry about that. But today I thought we would look at how you can get better at fly tying, and quicker too. To be honest I am not the greatest fly tyer, I am lazy and prefer fishing to tying flies, so most of my flies are about as simple as I can make them without losing confidence in their efficacy.

But if you are a relative newby, and for many who are not, there are some tricks which can make your fly tying more productive over the longer term.

Most tyers, particularly new ones have a terrible tendency to chop and change, it is fun admittedly to tie a Woolly Bugger, then a Hare’s Ear Nymph, then a Pheasant Tail, but it messy and doesn’t really help you improve.

Over my lifetime I have had to , or chosen to, learn a number of new things, typing springs to mind and there is no real way to master that without the simple expedient of continuous repetition. Yes boring, but effective.

By tying the same pattern over and over and then gradually going down in size you will master it far more efficiently than by changing from one to another.

The reality is that although we would all like to consider ourselves very clever and our abilities due to diligence and intelligence in equal measure, the reality is that most of what you and I are good at came from simple repetition. Be it your times tables in junior school or that you are allowed on the road in charge of a ton or so of lethal mechanical wonder.

When it comes to fly tying the only real way to get good and or efficient is to repeat the process, you never really “know” a fly pattern until you have tied a few dozen at least and it is better that you do that in a continuous stream rather than chopping and changing.

There are nuances which are difficult to learn without repetition. These days as I tie in a parachute post I instinctively lean it slightly towards me so that it kicks upright when I torque up the thread. When I lash in tails I do much the same, a very slight twist towards my side of the hook so the tails end up on top of the hook when tightened down. These “instinctive” minor adjustments come from repeating the process over and over, there really isn’t any shortcut.

Secondly repetition greatly improves proportions. Proportions on a fly are to a large degree personal, but I can look at a set of parachute dry flies and I know which ones I tied and which ones someone else did. They are not wrong and I am not right, but it is obvious and it comes from doing the same thing over and over again. I like mine the way they are and someone else likes their version, but they don’t produce a mixture of different proportions in the same batch of flies. That is efficiency, that is the result of repetition.

Of late I have been tying up some Blue Winged Olives, a variation of an “F” Fly pattern. The standard “F” fly just never quite looked right to me, no matter that it is effective , in fact very effective. But by adding a CDC collar to that pattern I feel more confident in it. It is a pattern fairly new to me so the first attempts were not quite as I liked them. However I employed the same methodology that I have for many flies in the past.

Start off by tying the larger version of whatever pattern you are working on, in this case they were #14’s.

Throw away or cut down any that you are not immediately looking forward to fishing, if you are not confident in them as they come off the vice I assure you you won’t fish them, they will languish in your fly box until rust takes hold and you bin them anyway. You can expect to throw out or cut down several as you start the process.

However once you have a dozen or so which all look the way you want them, and all look the same, then switch to the next hook size down and repeat the process.

Then go down a further hook size and keep doing that until you get to the smallest ones that you think you are likely to fish.

It is a monotonous venture at one level but hugely beneficial in the longer term. Not only will you end up with a box of flies where you don’t need to “hunt around for a good one” on the river, but you will find that once you have ingrained the proportions and the tying method you can get back into tying the same pattern quite quickly even months later.

When I first started tying Comparaduns they looked horrible, they were new to me, I was used to tying hackles and parachute hackles but not these and it took time to get the right amount of hair on the hook, the right length, proportions were to start with highly variable. But after a few dozen one “gets in the groove” then you can tie them faster, smaller and more efficiently..

I very rarely tie less than a dozen of any pattern at any time even now, I find it more efficient to do so and I have less materials littering the fly tying bench.. There is a satisfaction in having a nice neat row of identical flies when you have finished.

During lockdown I haven’t done quite as much fly tying as I hoped but I have always tied flies in at least “tens”.. if you get really bored with it, perhaps just change the colour scheme , but try to tie a dozen or more flies all the same before moving on.

The long shanked Hare’s Ear nymph has been a favourite stillwater pattern of mine for years.

To keep myself entertained I vary the colours a bit , I am not sure that the trout give a fig about that.

The exact same pattern in Olive

And again a row in pink

And ten or so inĀ  Claret

Eventually, after a few dozen of one pattern I have a change and start on something completely different

By repeating the same patterns over and over you will gain speed , efficiency and uniformity .

 

Be brutal with yourself, strip down the flies that don’t look the same as the others, you will pretty soon be churning them out, all near identical and at least for me, that will give me confidence on the water.

Thanks for reading, stay safe out there.