Lockdown Day 9

Corona Virus Lockdown day 9

The Parachute Spider (Variant).

Spider patterns have been around for a long time and they suffer from a nomenclature problem. To some anglers spider patterns are just that, imitations of actual spiders and there is little doubt that the fish will feed on such things. Then the term “spider” has also been applied to soft hackle wet flies as in “North Country Spider” and equally to over hackled dry flies which can also be termed “Variants”. The “Variant” term simply implies that the fly is tied with oversized hackle compared to the Catskill norm of 1½ the hook gape. In this instance it is the variant style which is implied, the use of an oversized hackle, although tied in parachute format.

North Country patterns such as this lovely example are also referred to as “spiders”

This is Peter Briggs’ Wolf Spider and a fly actually designed to imitate a real spider

A variant style dry fly with oversized hackles is often referred to as a “spider pattern” it is this style that I discussing today, although in a parachute format

As with so many guide type flies this one has a long and convoluted lineage, it has been modified, developed and fiddled with by myriad anglers over the years. I suppose that the true original of this pattern was a beaten up and chewed Royal Coachman, which continued to catch fish despite it bedraggled state and gave rise to a famous South African fly the RAB. The RAB was the brainchild of Tony Biggs, who having had tremendous success with his scruffy Coachman deliberately tied a fly with similar colouration and a great deal more movement. The RAB acronym actually stands for “Red Arsed Bastard”, although it has equally been referred to as the “Rough and Buoyant” due to the cautious sensibilities of some anglers at the time.

Tony Biggs’ RAB pattern has been modified over and over again, these are close to the original and tied by Tony’s long standing fishing friend Tom Sutcliffe.

This variation, and there are dozens of them, came about because I never particularly liked the standard RAB. It certainly can be effective at times, but I always felt that the over hackling relative to the hook size resulted in a lot more takes than it did in hook ups. The fly always seemed to create an expectation of success without actually delivering the goods. There are those who disagree, so it is very much a question of personal opinion.

By turning the fly into a parachute style the mobility of the longer “halo hackle” is retained whilst the hook up issues are ameliorated. Equally the standard tie is almost impossible to fish on fine tippet due to the spinning effect of the oversized hackle; the parachute style removes that hiccup very effectively.

The great advantage of this style, to my mind, is that the fly very nearly presents itself. It really does land like the proverbial thistledown and even for anglers who struggle to cope with long fine tippets the fly will introduce slack into the leader and provide “drag free floats” even for the average caster. Then of course there is that inherent mobility of the materials, the wiggling legs that proved so effective in the original. I no longer limit myself to the classical red and pheasant tail livery of the original and will tie the pattern in a wide variety of colour schemes. It is more a style than a pattern I suppose you could say.

Others tie the fly with all manner of additional accoutrements, legs fashioned from anything from Egyptian Goose to Vervet Monkey hair but as a true guide fly the materials have to be obtainable and easily incorporated and that is where the halo hackle of Coq de Leon comes to the fore. It is an unlikely looking bug to most anglers, but it can prove tremendously effective, having the ability to draw fish up on slow days and equally represent any number of real insects from actual spiders to large mayflies. It has caught fish on streams ranging from hallowed waters running through chalk meadows in Southern England, to freestone spate rivers on several continents. Due to its size and visibility it also makes for an excellent and delicate indicator fly when throwing nymphs upstream.

Not long ago I was fishing over a massive and one can safely assume educated brown trout on a local catch and release water. The fish was feeding sporadically on something very tiny and not easily identified.

I made numerous casts over that fish, with a variety of “killer patterns”, a BSP, then a brassie, a soft hackled midge pattern and my favoured “hatch breaker” the Compar-a-ant. All to no avail. Then in desperation I heaved out a large parachute spider, and the fish took on the first drift. It was one of the best brown trout I have ever seen come off one of these rivers, well over twenty inches and probably in the region of 4lbs in weight.

This large brown trout fell to a parachute spider after refusing several other more imitative and smaller flies.

So don’t imagine for a moment that this rather strange pattern can’t fool smart fish, it undoubtedly can.

A versatile pattern, perhaps a little more complicated than some guide flies but not overly so and well worth manufacturing and testing.

The tying sequence is pretty much standard BSP with the only real variation of having two hackles, a standard hackle and a “halo hackle” .

If you are keen to push on and not to wait for the various instructions coming you can download the books on line and benefit from a 50% discount. The links and discount codes are shown below:

Discount code Essential Fly Tying Techniques: DR62J Code will expire 17 April 2020

Discount code Guide Flies : SB94S Code will expire 17 April 2020

Thanks for reading, stay safe out there.

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